The Best Wine Regions to Visit in France

France is a popular destination for oenophiles. Visiting lots of estates and tasting the wine can be tricky. Unless the winery has a shop, you need to make an appointment before visiting. Here is a

France is a popular destination for oenophiles. Visiting lots of estates and tasting the wine can be tricky. Unless the winery has a shop, you need to make an appointment before visiting. Here is a summary of the best wine regions in France.

Burgundy

Burgundy is a stunning region that encompasses Dijon, Beaune, and Nuits-Saint-Georges. This region mainly produces Pinot Noir and Chardonnay and is known for its expensive wines. For those who do not fear complex wines, the Burgundy terroir offers wine with an elegant, aromatic, and complex profile. The fantastic red wines possess cherrystone, white tobacco, and plum flavors, while the white wines are filled with apple, pear, white flower, and dried grasses aromas.

Champagne

Similar to Burgundy, Champagne’s iconic sparkling wine is made from Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. In Champagne, the grapes do not turn as ripe as in Burgundy because it is located farther north. The champagne grapes do not get as ripe meaning they are better suited to sparkling wine production.

Loire Valley

This is a beautiful region that has a lot to offer on top of its wine-making activities. You can visit historic towns like Chinon or Angers, the pinnacle of Renaissance castles. There are museums and cultural events. The region has several distinct parts, namely Anjou, Touraine, Pouilly-Fuissé, Sancerre, and Pays Nantais. Expect diversity in landscapes, people, and wines.

Its large variety of excellent wines include white, red, rosé, dry, sweet, still and sparkling. Small families run the domaines, and the prices are relatively low even at the best growers. The Loire Valley region is ideal if you plan on spending more than three days on a wine trip.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux city is home to the world’s greatest wine museum and possesses great beach-front spots like Pyla and Arcachon. Every year the city of Bordeaux organizes a wine festival during which wine lovers can indulge in red wines, namely cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, and merlot. For some more sight-seeing, there is the Dordogne famous for medieval castles and “foie-gras” producers.

Languedoc

The Languedoc region has a sea-front to the Mediterranean dotted with interesting towns like Montpellier, Narbonne, or Aigues Mortes. The wines are incredibly diverse, and even the best ones are comparatively inexpensive.

When planning a wine tour, it is advisable to take a wine guide book. You can also opt to pick out the estates that interest you and which are available to receive visitors.

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